B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro
B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro

Episode · 1 week ago

Exploring the state of desktop technologies w/ Brawn Consulting & how desktops are evolving

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The need for consistent displays and ergonomic accommodations drives the future of desktop setups. 

Leading brands are creating first-class resolutions that will spoil you for monitors forever. 

Shelby Skrhak speaks with Jonathan Brawn , principal of Brawn Consulting, about: 

- The current state of desktops

- How improved resolutions affect productivity

- The future of desktops 

To join the discussion, follow us on Twitter @IngramTechSol #B2BTechTalk 

Listen to this episode and more like it by subscribing to B2B Tech Talk on Spotify , Apple Podcasts, or Stitcher . Or tune in on our website.

You're listening to be tob tech talk with Ingram Micro, the place to learn about new technology and technological advances before they become mainstream. This podcast is sponsored by Ingram micros imagine next. It's not about the destination, it's about going someplace you never thought possible. Go to imagine next DOT Ingram microcom to find out war. Let's get into it. Welcome to be to be tech talk with Ingram micro. I'm your host. She'll be Scurrhawk, and our guest today is Jonathan Braun, principle of Braun Consulting. For more than twenty years, Braun consulting has worked with Samsung and their displayed division. Jonathan, welcome. Thank you, shelby. It's an honor to be here today. Excellent. Well, today we are talking about what's hot and desktop marketing and Samsung's offerings for businesses. But first, Jonathan, let's hone in on desktop displays. Samsung has a lot of skews then, so to speak. So what range of products are we talking about here? Well, you set a mouthful there. Samsung does have a ton of skews. I've been working with the team for a long time, as you said, in your wonderful introduction. Thank you for that. And I've got to work with all the different types of commercial displays, going back to the days when all they had were one or two desktop monitors and a bunch of Plasma TV's. Boy, I'm dating myself with that right right. And you know today they've got so many advanced flat panel technologies and that before you even mentioned like all the consumer TV products they have like the new Qdo led panels. Hopefully I'll get a chance to talk about Qdo led later, but really fantastic technology. I can't wait until that gets into desktop monitors. But the reality is today I'm hoping not to focus too much on specific products because I want to give the audience just as much general information as we can about what's going on in the Industry today in trends with desktop monitor technology and what's really happening. However, I do want to mention a few displays that Samsung does offer, particularly their high resolution products,...

...since they're being kind enough to send me over to talk with you in the audience today. They've got a whole range and what they're calling their s series, which is kind of their high resolution, higher performance, kind of mainstream monitors today, although we'll talk hopefully about why they're becoming mainstream later, like the s ninety five series, which is their ultra wides yes ad series, which is going to be things that are K with USBC, which is a really important trend, the seventy series, and even kind of their more budget friendly as sixt series, catchy tiered naming scheme on behalf of Samsung. It actually makes sense. I remember when the part numbers were all alphabet soup and it was a lot more difficult to understand what was what. So now they've kind of stacked it up for US pretty nicely and they've got a lot of things to offer, mostly focusing on larger sizes, which I think that's another important trend. But that might be getting hit of myself. We can get into that in a minute. Yeah, yeah, well, you know, I'll be the first to admit that I couldn't tell you exactly what the very best, the very latest resolution is for display monitors and unless I think you're keeping up with you know the CES and product you know releases. I think there's a lot like me that that don't necessarily know the very latest. So one I want to follow up on something you said about why USBC is an important trend. But I guess before we get into that let's give a quick primer of the technology. Now I know that plasma is no longer a thing, but is ten ATP no longer really the gold standard? You know that that's actually a really great, great question and you know the reality is a lot of people know ten ATP. They know that number. It's recognizable, or they'll know the term hdt because we spent so long, and that's about when I first got involved with Samsung, was around the transition from standard definition into high definition or HD, and it wasn't just ten ATP at the time. It was twenty p and then ten ATP. But today, no,...

...ten ETP really isn't the gold standard anymore. It's still super common for low cost displays. You'll see that across entry level desktop monitors. You'll see that across entry level laptops. But what we've been seeing, especially over the last three or four years, has been rapidly transitioning away from that towards higher resolutions. Now I don't want to go out into the super exotic stuff where we start talking about UNOBTAINIUM, where yeah, you can have one. Maybe the company that manufactures it can build one and it'll cost you, you know, a squillion dollars. But large format displays both in the home and office. When talk about large format, I'm not talking about desktop here. I'm talking about your home television or digital signage or conference room displays. So when you're talking about things, let's say like forty three inches and up, the larger display, hence large format. Again, catchy naming there, but almost all of those have transitioned over to kuhd being the norm. That was the next step up from ten ATP, at least in terms of TV's. I'll explain more in a minute because there's some other things. We talked about, desktops and laptops that sit in between. But that for Kuhd, which, if we're counting PIXELS, that's thirty eight forty by twos, one hundred and sixty instead of the original nineteen twenty by ten eighty that ten ATP was made up of, and that's, by the way, where we got ten ATP. For anybody out in the audience who wasn't aware that was. That's the vertical resolution, which is why you'll hear K U H D instead of ten atphd or ten DP fhd, full HD. You'll hear kuhd sometimes called sixtep to keep it in that kind of naming structure, although commonly we all know it is for Kuhd. That's most of the consumer brands are using. It's easy for evenly people to get a grasp one. Now that's the norm today, and that's actually four times the resolution of ten ATP because, if you think about it, it's not just double the height, it's also double the whip. So it takes ten ETP screens make K and that's what we've started...

...doing in digital cinema, that's what we've been doing in home theater and now that's what we do in most of our commercial displays. And even today. A Kuhd the next step up, which is seventy eighty by forty three, twenty, and no, nobody's calling it for twenty P. thank goodness. I think we're finally going to let that one go. That's a relic of the past. But the AKU HD is even starting to become more common. Still Higher D for Consumer TV's and things like gaming. You don't really see it in desktop monitors. It exists, but it's extremely exotic. But you'll see that in higher end home theater product and people who are kind of early adopters, if you have the budget for it. When we talk about desktop monitors and laptops, by extension, you're going to hear an additional term. So you'll hear a ten ATP. Sure you'll also hear for Kuhd. Absolutely Samsung makes a number of those products as well. But you're going to hear another resolution added in where you're going to hear terms like fourteen forty P and qhd. Qhd, what the heck? So that's a resolution that well, four forty P HD refer to the same thing, by the way, just like Kuhd or uhd ultra high definition mean basically the same thing. But fourteen forty P was designed to sit in between ten ATP. It was the next step up that manufacturers started building, but then they added K. So it kind of sits in the middle. And that's going to be two, five hundred and sixty by fourteen forty not still keeping the same kind of aspect ratio that we're used to, that sixteen by nine type aspect ratio. All there are sixteen by ten products out there like nineteen, twenty by twelve hundred. Isn't an example of a sixteen by ten. Most people do with sixteen by nine. It's meant to be higher resolution than ten, ATP at fourteen forty P right, and it's meant for people who wanted more for a productivity. But it was also really pushed by Gamers, because one of the things that happens, this is something that comes across with all consumer technologies, is you'll...

...see something introduced in the home, whether it's something that was adopted by Gamers or something like the virtual assistance. Don't worry, I'm not going to name anything, so our audience does have theirs go off or mind go all right, exactly this. I'm not. I'm not naming any but those technologies get pushed into the workplace. Well, four forty P resolution monitors did too. They were brought out. A lot of adoption was done by Gamers who wanted higher refresh rates. It was easier to drive faster refresh rates from monitors that resolution and that then is spilled over to wait a minute. That works really well in a laptop form factor. That works really well in desktop monitor. So you'll see that for that kind of intermediate step for somebody's little more budget friendly. And then there's also wqhd. Now this is where we start talking about ultra wide products, which I'll dig into in a little bit, I hope. But ultra wide where we're starting to expand that wider than nineteen twenty or in some cases even wider than what K does at thirty forty, where we need a lot more resolution. That's where you'll see things like wqhd, wide qhd. They'll still be fourteen forty tall, but they'll go upwards of three four forty and yes, that's weird comparing that to thirty forty and K, but it's a super stretch and that's another big trend in both gaming and productivity where we're getting that ultra wide form factor. And this is all driving a lot of what was early adoptors but now kind of moving into more mainstream where that's what people are buying and using a lot of the time. Why would the ultra wide screen the you know, I guess these are the curve screens that that you've seen. Why would that be better than than multiple monitors? Well, I don't know. That's necessarily better exactly. But it's the same reason why you would use multiple monitors right where. And I'm sit in front of a dual monitor set up myself. It's what I use daytoday. It's my daily driver. I still am not fancy enough to have bought an ultra wide, but frankly, two screens does the same job. The issue...

...more comes into thinking about connectivity and other things where, okay, I've got two monitors, I've got to have to video connections. Not every laptop or computer can drive that. Most desktops Cam not every laptop can. Or if I get an ultra wide, it's one connection and it's much simpler to implement. And having dual monitors where you can have that screen real estate is just amazing. Where I'll be on particular project to be working on a systems design and I've got notes on the left hand screen and my main work on the first. It's just something. It's spoils you and you never want to go back once you've done it right. And so then, following up on what she has said earlier about USBC, why is that an important trend? Yeah, USBC is important because what we're doing is simplifying things so there's kind of two aspects to USBC. USBC when we have that as an option on our monitors. One, it's a lot more universal because most laptops today, and I got to think more about laptops, because if you look at where things have gone in terms of office work today, people are much more mobile. You've got a lot of work from home. You've got high grid where people working part of the time in the office part of the time at home. You've got office hotelling where maybe you're working in the office full time but you're moving from desk to desk to desk as kind of managing capacity and other things just for comfort and for safety. So we start seeing this. USBC is convenient because it doesn't worry about what kind of connectors do your laptop half. Most of the time, if I've got a PC or if I've got a Mat, I've got USBC. You may not necessarily have HDMI or display port, or you might have many display portans to the full size display port or or etc. And so having USBC makes it a lot easier to connect. But there's another issue with USBC, because what we're starting to see is a trend towards monitors almost becoming a doc because for anybody who's been around computers for...

...a long time remembers the Batt old days, or good old days, depending on your level of nostalgia, when we used to have to buy really expensive proprietary docks for your laptop, where you own something like an Ivm, think pad, you'd have this big old dock and you drop your laptop into it on your desk and then you pull it out and you know, go home or you travel. And today docks are a lot simpler. Like I've got a thunderbolt for DOC sitting here on my desk that my monitors are connected to. So it's display port from them to the dock. Thunderbolt, which is a form of USBC Intel proprietary, does a few more things, but let's just say it's USBC for the sake of argument, to my laptop and the dock provides power, provides peripherals, all that kind of stuff. We'll today, and you'll see this in a lot of the Samsung monitors, as I mentioning earlier, when you look at the USBC lines, you'll see USB ports and other features on the Monitor. Wait. Why? Because it can act like a dock. I can in an office plug my keyboard, my mouse, potentially headphones or speakers into the monitor and in some cases you'll have what's called USBC PD, or power delivery. We're up to a certain waddage and about sixty seven watts is pretty common, although there are hundred watch standards. That's what my laptop needed because it was a little more power hungry. There are greater USBC power delivery standards on the horizon which you're going to be very exciting for people. But I've got that where I can plug in one table to my laptop. It's got power, it's got data to all my peripherals, it's got video. So now if you think about that environment where I'm on the go, where I've got to get up from my office desk here at my Home Office and I'm going to go meet with a client, where I'm going to go on a trip or whatever, I can unplug one cable, plug one cable simple or if I'm moving around an office or if I've got multiple staff sharing an office, or I think you get the idea. So that's a really powerful capability and that's why you see more and more laptops now coming with just usb seaports all the hopefully more of them and less dongles. I hate that part, right right. Well, so with you know...

...what we think about desktop displays in terms of this product adoption curve. You mentioned about you the the early adopters and kind of the center majority or the mass majority. So would you say then, that most businesses are looking for the Kuhd as the you know, that's sort of becoming the standard, then, that most businesses are going to be asking for? It absolutely is. So there's a couple of important trends there. So we already talked about ultra wides. I think that's a really good one because, again, more desktop screen real estate can equal more productivity. If I spend less time shuffling documents and more time actually working on things, it's better for me because it's less work I have to do, and it's better for my employer because I'm able to do a more efficient job. And we talked about USBC and all that, the resolution aspect that's helping drive adoption of new monitors. Because, frankly, if you think about it, and I was an early adopt for K desktop monitors, my dad also works with me from time to time and he came over and used my office a couple of times and he's like, Oh, I hate these things, I can't read a darned thing. Won't it once you get used to it, it's really fantastic. A lot more scream real estate for the same size. So I'm an early a doctor, but I think that's kind of what I experienced. Is kind of starting to drive more businesses where I want to have more pixels because that lets me maximize my screen real estate for the size of the screen and able to show more things on screen with that same space. But it also means clearer and sharper images and that's better for organomics. It's better for eyestrain. That's an important thing. How much time do we all spend in front of a desktop monitor these days? And so if you've got a company looking to improve the workers experience and thus increased productivity, putting in a larger, higher resolution monitor, typically for K although sometimes fourteen forty P hd depending on budgeting, that can totally change that users experience and what they're capable of doing, and it's also cheaper...

...than replacing the full computer. So you think about okay, you've got somebody sitting at their desk with a laptop with, let's say it's got a ten ATP s free, very standard resolution. Yeah, fifteen inch stream ten ADP. I'm sitting there hunched over that thing working on it. That can be awkward. Where now I buy myself a monitor like let's say Samsung Sad. Just pull one out of nowhere. It's a k with let's let's say it's got USBC, and I drop that on the desk and now it's not only easier for my employee to move their laptop up to and fro, but now they're sitting there at a bigger monitor. I can give a thirty two inch K got a nice keyboard and mouse now, so they're physically going to be more comfortable. It's going to be much better for their productivity because they got the bigger screen real estate and the better resolution, just better image quality and frankly, you don't want to go back once you get used to it and a better experience. I mean you know, we've all had that, that realization that you know you're walking through the office and you're like, wait a minute, that monitors a whole lot sharper than mine and it doesn't have that weird yellow tent. Huh. You come to your desk you're like, Oh, mine is sad. So you know, there's a little bit of I don't know if you'd say a morale boost, but you know that's, you know, just making making employees job a little bit easier and and having electronics and, you know, things that basically are just better for you. Absolutely there's nothing like you have to come back to the office. So we're going to let's say we're going to a hybrid and I'm going to be in the office some of the time, but maybe we've got a hoteling program and I reserve a desk. I come back in and instead of just I'm going to throw my laptop down, now I've got a nice slim bezel bright thirty two inch K display. I've got one cable sitting on the desk to hook up to it. It's on a nice ergonomic arm so that I can set a height right for me. Might be curved, might not, depends on, you know, workplace buying policies, but now I've got a much better experience. That's going to make me feel better about being there because I'm going to have a new experience and that helps. You know that's it's about making people...

...feel comfortable and boosting productivity. Absolutely well. So let's talk about kind of what's more of the early adopters. You said you want to talk a little bit about qled. Is that kind of what the very the very latest, you know, the kind of the shiny new object that people are really salivating of her absolutely, so I'm going to geek out of it. I'm sorry in advance. Someone use a lot of use a lot of jargon and I'm going to try and make sure I define. I need some titles sometimes for this stuff, but I'm a trying to find everything. So, yeah, I mentioned Qdo led and I do want to talk about that, but I'm going to talk about some current things that are available right now as we sit that are kind of the cutting edge, and then where we going in the immediate future, because there is an exciting development there and that is legitimately being led by Samsung. So that's when I can give them credit for without sounding like I'm being a company man, but they developed technology they called q let and that's actually the monitors that I used every day. Q led and q led technology was originally put into consumer televisions to improve their performance. But it's also been brought into desktop monitors and you'll see that on a lot in the flagship monitors at Samsung offers like their Odyssey series, the g seven and the GNINE, their kind of top end product. Those are a little more gaming oriented, although they do have a commercial version and they are like the topnotch ones they offer. They're really impressive. Q led technology changes the backlight. So when we talk about backlining at LCD tutorial, you got an LCD display, you've got the liquid crystal and behind it you have like that's what we look at and the liquid crystal manipulates the light to create the image you see. Grossly over simplifying, but I don't want to go on for forty five minutes on just that topic. Q led built on that by changing the backlight technology using something called quantum dots. I can use that in conversation. That sounds awesome, and quantum dots react with UV light. So what Samsun did was they baked in quantum dot technology, although it's their own take on quantum...

...dot, using a metallic quantum dot, which again I'm using that unironically, and actual conversation. Yeah, and they put blue leds in with these quantum dots, and so it's able to produce much, much, much broader color than a traditional LCD. They can put out over a billion different colors with this technology and it's what you see in their highest performance consumer TV's. Well, up until very recently, Qudio led more in a second and so that's becoming something you're seeing in a lot more high end desktop monitors. Because I want that experience now. It's not because I want to play games, although added bonus if you do. Yeah, but if you think about content creation, photo editing, film editing, better color, yeah, better experience, better output. Right. You're also going to see a lot of high dynamic range. This has been something anybody who's been following photography for the last few years is going to be well familiar with. But displays also have been over last couple of years really hotly put wishing HDR identimic range. So Samsung developed the HDR ten and ten plus standard, meaning they can produce brighter highlights and darker shadows, but keeping because of the amount of detail produced in part of that's the cut. I can't even speak q led technology forgive me, they're able to produce a better, more cinema like experience, and that's actually really important for eyestrain and again for content production. So that's another cutting edge thing. You don't see that in every desktop display, but when you do, you know, okay, that's somebody who's really serious about desktop. Now buying a home theater TV, that's another animal, or buying a commercial display. All of Samsung's commercial displays, or vast majority of them, feature HDR ten as an example. But yeah, that kind of HDR technology is absolutely again another signature of cutting edge and contem DOTS. I like the sound of that. It absolutely it sounds so cool and and I love getting to say that. And well, and I mentioned QDEO led. So I'm going to do...

...that one real quick because I think that's something that the audience should keep an eye on. No Pun intended. Okay, that was terrible. I'll see myself. That was that was awful. Right. Well, except and post I deserve that one now. But QDO led. QDO led is the new technology that has a very real promise to make the vast majority of other display technologies obsolete. Samsung announced it about a year ago but it was shown off at sees this year. So your point. Unless you go to see yes frequently, it's hard to keep up on all this stuff. QDO led is quantum dot, organic lightnminting diode or oh led technology, and there are other oh led displays from some of Samsung's competitors out there. Samsung uses them for cell phones and tablets, but you don't see them as often in desktop monitors. They're awfully expensive. But what Qdo led promises to do is take all the benefits of quantum dot and all the benefits of o led technology and kind of Boltron it together, and what it means is it'll produce better brightness than a traditional oh led but it won't burn in like a traditional Oh led can, and it's able to produce that really wide, rich color gamute and saturation. And right now it's currently one of the most accurate, if not the most accurate, displays that we can produce, and you already starting to see Samsung brought out their first consumer line of those in fifty five and sixty five inch sizes and you're going to see a lot more and I can't wait for that to get into mainstream desktop monitors, because this is one of those rare times I will pre order something right right. Well, yeah, and just that makes absolutely sense. I mean you, I guess you don't think about it just the when you're doing content creation, when you're editing photos, when you're creating, you know, creating graphics, you need that precision. You need that especially when you're dealing with specific colors, specific tones. You know, not all monitors are created equal and and you know, something that can...

...look okay to you, put that on another screens can look completely different. You want the most accurate possible display right exactly. You want to stay super consistent, which is also why we advocate, least I do advocate, calibrating your displays, but that's a whole nother discussion. I can spend a lot of hours on. Yeah, so we've talked a little bit about this already, but, you know, let's talk about what's possible with digital technology, like what you know today's displays can do. I mean the the possibilities are broad, from digital signage to restaurant ordering kiosks, you know, to more artistic displays. So I guess could you share some examples of what these displays are doing? Now. Oh, absolutely. I mean the reality is skies the limit. You know, when we talk about desktop monitors, they are a little more specific because you're usually dealing with a smaller display. Even the ultra wide products. They go upwards of about forty nine inches ultra wide, which is impressively big, and they're usually curved. You do see some flat ultrawides, but smaller and yeah, when you see somebody who's really being an overachiever, sometimes they'll stack multiples of them, which is impressive. Yeah, that gets wild, or you see the really crazy gamers will have like two or three of them so I've got a hundred eighty degree view. That kind of stuff is fun, but in terms of real practical use, I mean think about it. You've got digital signage, which is everywhere, traditionally larger displays, something Samson does very well. But you'll see, you know, digital menu boards, you'll see digital drive throughs. It's rare today you're ordering food and you're not looking at a screen doing it, and they don't mean ordering it on your cell phone. I'm not going to judge anybody's door habit, but when you're looking at that display in the restaurant, also a retail word faced with an interesting dilemma where now, as we're starting to get back out in public and people are starting to shop again more comfortably, there's an experiential question. What are we using displays for that we can help boost the idea of not well, why do you go to store? A overstore be...

...but why do you go to the store at all? Right, why don't you just order it online? Or why don't you just have curbside pickup or whatever? Or if you're feeling really desperate, why don't you just have postmates pick it up for you? Whatever works, and I'm not going to judge. We've all been there. So now it's more that we have to give people reasons to be out and do things and interact with our brands, and that's ultimately what all the end users who are buying these displays are thinking about, especially for digital signage. And there's all kinds of other uses where now you start thinking about in this kind of emerge during the pandemic era and you know, fortunately things are starting to improve for all of us, but I don't want to go talk to a person if I'm going to order food or if I'm going to know I want to use a screen because, yeah, you have cooties, I don't want to deal with you. Right, okay, fine, I get it. People are scary. So you saw a transition where people are putting in more interactive kiosks and more point of sale ordering, where self service, where you'd have that I could walk up, I could touch a screen, I don't have to deal with a person. I mean you even saw screens being put into smartlockers where you'd go up and you'd scan a Qr Code and you pick up your products that you ordered online. There's a big screen in the middle doing advertising and guiding and instructions, but you never even talked to somebody. Yeah, and of course there's all the entertainment and everything we know about, and this is encompassing displays from, you know, as small as a desktop monitor, which, to be fair, can be used for digital signage. They're just smaller. So you've got specific use cases for them, but all the way up to video walls and directly led displays and all the other things we see everywhere. Yeah, I mean we're talking about before before we started recording, about you know, the conferences infocommon and Las Vegas and, yeah, I mean there's there's an example of some impressive digital signage there in the airport. Oh yeah, absolutely. Transportations become a huge one. To think about how much information you need to get, especially now where it's like, okay, the TSA kind of transformed a...

...lot of airports early on because they had to have all of the signage educating us all about security protocols, especially as they evolved. But now you still see that where there's all the digital signs reminding people, especially whatever rock you've lived under the you haven't flown recently. I guess I shouldn't make that joke these days, but people who are not used to flying anymore. There, I'll clean that up a little bit, but you know, it's that kind of education. Also, healthcare was a big explosion because of covid when it was like, okay, I need to remind everybody of what the latest thinking is, what the latest understanding is. Remember your social distancing, where your masks and so there was a need to communicate dynamically, very similar what we saw in transportation. Then, of course, the fact that airports have hybridized with both restaurants and shopping malls now, where you see so much of those same things, whether it's retail or food service, that we would see outside of your airport. But Yeah, mccarran Airport Vegas is a great example. The Casino area is notwithstanding. Well, I love the variety that we've talked about today. We've talked about, you know, these huge displays. That's really kind of it can be mind modeling was possible with digital signage all the way down to, you know, what we started with is, you know, desktop displays. You know what a business needs, what they're asking for, and so understanding that landscape of what's out there. So with that in mind, we always ask our guests the same final question, and that's weird. Do you see technology going in the next year? So what does Your Crystal Wall say? Yeah, well, I mentioned, you know, the CUTEO led technology, but not being such a nerd, although I do wear that badge with pride, I think what we're going to see is some real improvements in your average technology, when I'm speaking about displays, your average technology that people are implementing. Yeah, because those of us who are willing to be early adopters bought in, drove the volume up, and that means it drives the price down and that's good, and I'm one of those. I'm sitting in front of qled monitors, not QDO led, those aren't out,...

...yeah, but qled monitors. I've got to thirty two inch Samsung for K displays that I use on a day to day basis. I Love Them. They're fantastic. But the fact that those of US bought in means that as that volume goes up in the demand increases, that's going to be more readily available for your average person and that's going to give all of us better experiences in displays and as those things like we talked about earlier, and yeah, this has been a wonderful discussion, those things we talked about earlier, like USBC, is that becomes more commonplace and it becomes more of a standard, it's going to be better for the users, and so that's what I think is we're going to continue to see the display, which it is a focal point of a lot of things we do in our daily lives, becoming a better experience and easier to use for so many people, and that's a great feeling, well so for our listeners who want to find out more about what we talked about today happen that reachail. Absolutely so. The easiest way to get more information about any of the cool technologies I talked about is to visit our friends Damsung on the web, samsungcom business or display solutions dot samsungcom. You can learn all about all the cool technologies, not just the stuff we talked about today, but their whole display portfolio. Very, very cool things there and a lot of new things coming out at Infocom. So they're going to be announcing a whole bunch of new products and always exciting and that's where I keep an eye on what's going on. Absolutely wells are on the ill. You appreciate the time that insight get, getting a chance to go go deep, good wide and understand a little bit of all what's possible with with displays. So thank you so much. Well, thank you. Shall Be. I really appreciate being here today and thank you listeners for tuning in subscribing to be tob tech talk with Ingram micro. If you like this episode or have a question, please join the discussion on twitter with the Hashtag B Tob Tech Talk. Until next time, I'm shall be Scar Hawk. You've been listening to beb tech talk with Ingram micro. This episode was sponsored by Ingram...

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